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App Review: Brave Browser

By Larry Ye April 7, 2022


Rating: (5/5) Privacy-oriented, less resource-intensive, unnecessary features.


Google Chrome currently dominates the internet browser industry, serving over 60% of users across all platforms per GlobalStats. However, the browser is often criticized for its high CPU consumption and privacy intrusions. On the other hand, the newly developed browser Brave optimizes the browsing experience by prioritizing speed and protecting users’ privacy without compensating Chrome’s positives.


Brave was co-founded by Brendan Eich, creator of JavaScript, and Brian Bondy, former employee at Khan Academy, Mozilla and Evernote. Since it is based on Chromium—the same platform that powers Google Chrome—Brave looks and functions similarly to Chrome with a few key differences that make it worth the switch.


Thanks to optimizations in the script, Brave can load pages faster than Chrome while conserving battery life and bandwidth.

The most notable distinction between Brave and Chrome involves memory and power saving. Thanks to optimizations in the script, Brave can load pages faster than Chrome while conserving battery life and bandwidth. These features allow me to keep various tabs open all at once and be much more efficient while working online.

Additionally, the browser has an effective and streamlined built-in ad blocker known as Brave Shields, which blocks all ads, trackers and third-party cookies. Although installing an ad-blocking extension in Chrome serves the same purpose, this takes up additional memory.


To avoid completely cutting off revenue for ad-reliant websites, Brave allows users to opt-in to the Brave Private Ads network for non-intrusive ad notifications. Known as Brave Rewards, users are gifted crypto tokens for clicking on ads, which they can then trade for gift cards, other currencies or tips for their favorite websites.


The first [privacy option] is similar to Chrome’s Incognito Mode, [which] allows users to browse without saving their history, cookies or submitted data

Brave offers users more privacy options with two different types of private windows, both of which are compatible with Shields. The first, which is similar to Chrome’s Incognito Mode, allows users to browse without saving their history, cookies or submitted data; however, users’ activity could still be visible to their internet service provider or employer. In contrast, the second type of private window available on Brave includes Tor, a free open-source software that keeps users’ specific online activity fully confidential.


Overall, Brave greatly outperforms Chrome in privacy and task execution, heightening users’ digital security and productivity, and its familiar design makes it an easy-to-use alternative for Chrome users.


 

About the Contributor

Larry Ye

School & Community News Editor


Larry Ye is a junior at Leland High School and the School News and Community News page editor for The Charger Account. During his free time, he likes playing with his dog Meatball, traveling, and hiking.



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